Abstracts

Abstracts by Last Name of Presenter

How Innovative Ideas Transcend through Nurses Telling Stories

Neil Bardhan and Marion Leary 

Friday June 21, 10:45-11:00, 8th floor room 822

Description: If innovation represents ideas, who has better ideas than nurses? And what better way to express such ideas than storytelling! Learn how First Person Arts & Penn Nursing collaborated to create & present a live public storytelling event in which members of the nursing community shared their stories.

Neil Bardhan is a communication consultant based in Philadelphia. He has worked at the University of Rochester, The Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, and The University of Tuebingen. Neil now combines his interest in science, communication, and performance with workshops and coaching for diverse clients. He is the Manager of Applied Storytelling at First Person Arts.

Marion Leary is the Director of Innovation at Penn Nursing. Ms. Leary has established herself as a leader in the field of nursing innovation. Ms. Leary is a proponent of using science communication to amplify nursing science and was Philadelphia’s Geek of the year in 2017.


Teaching as a Playworker

Maria Battor

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Teaching as a Playworker by Maria Battor Teaching, as it is currently provisioned by relevant laws in the United States, is developmentally inappropriate in ways that hinder the effectiveness of both learning and teaching. Here I explore the dichotomy of doing good to children as a teacher.

Maria Battor has worked with children for over a decade. Currently her background in anthropology informs her work as a primary teacher. She is also a playworker at Kid Owned and Operated Play, an adventure playground in northern Illinois.


Movemathics: Math meets movement

Yonatan Berman

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Why memorize a formula, if you can substitute yourself into it? Movemathics turns the act memorization into an exciting social challenge. Students move, dance, perform and create art works out of mathematical concepts

Yonatan Berman is a qualified math teacher, with nearly a decade of teaching experience in both Israel and Germany. He is currently studying for Master’s in Educational Entrepreneurship, and writing his thesis about ways to incorporate elements of movements in math lessons. He has developed Movemathics, an initiative promoting social-kinesthetic learning and the art of perfomance in class using technology and social media.


RISE UP: Rutgers INSPIRE mentoring Sessions promote Early Undergraduate Participation in biomedical research

Sofya Borinskaya

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: To broaden participation in biomedical science and research at undergraduate level, INSPIRE fellows established mentoring sessions at minority-serving institutions. I will talk about the sessions, outcomes, reflections of the fellows and student feedback. Looking for ideas from CESTEMER audience.

Additional Contributors: Jennifer Fragale, Pragati Sharma, Victoria Dibona, Harita Menon, Suzanne M. Quartuccio

Sofya Borinskaya is a scientist, researcher and educator with training in electrical engineering (B.S.), biomedical science and computational biology (Ph.D.) and NIH IRACDA fellowship that includes teaching at minority-serving institutions. Sofya is an advocate of math education for life sciences and computational approaches in biological research. Sofya is applying improvisation and performance to enhance science education.


UX Science: Building Learning Ensembles Across Class and Race

Sofya Borinskaya, Dan Friedman, Raquell Holmes, Emma Shockley

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: All Stars Project, Inc. uses the developmental power of performance to build learning ensembles of students from different socio-economic backgrounds. Science faculty and students will share the impact that All Stars UX science classes have on their relationship to science and each other.

Sofya Borinskaya is a scientist, researcher and educator with training in electrical engineering (B.S.), biomedical science and computational biology (Ph.D.) and NIH IRACDA fellowship that includes teaching at minority-serving institutions. Sofya is an advocate of math education for life sciences and computational approaches in biological research. Sofya is applying improvisation and performance to enhance science education. sofya.borinskaya.com

Dan Friedman is a life-long political, performance activist and grassroots educator.  He is the associate dean of UX, the All Stars Project’s free school of continuing development, the artistic director of Castillo Theatre, and on faculty of the East Side Institute.  He is a theatre historian, a playwright, and is writing a Palgrave book on the global performance activist movement.  www.danfriedmannyc.org

Raquell Holmes, Ph.D, the founder of improvscience, is a pioneer in the use of improvisation and performance to advance scientific communities. Formally trained as a cell biologist, she uses her training in human development from the East Side Institute to help scientists build collaborative learning and research environments.

Emma Shockley has a degree in physics, in addition to a rigorous background in dance and other movement modalities. She is currently working towards becoming a Certified Movement Analyst, with the goal of eventually developing a methodology for integrating movement into tradition classroom environments.


Performing Research

Latrelle Bright

Thursday June 20, 2:45-3:30, 8th floor room 822

Description: We are the storytelling animal.  What story do you want to tell? Explore metaphor, text, movement and sound and bring your research to life for the stage. Arrive with you a brief bit of text or data you wish to explore.  Leave with new ways of thinking about it and engaging with it.

Latrelle Bright is a freelance theatre maker and arts advocate. She has served as Program Coordinator for INNER VOICES Social Issues Theatre at the University of Illinois.  She currently serves as an adjunct professor at the University of Illinois and Parkland College. Latrelle develops workshops for local organizations, creates performance pieces around issues of labor and the environment and directs theatrical productions.


“Bate-papo com Café”: a conversation café for immigrants in brazilian context

Viviane Carrijo and Natilia El Hage 

Saturday June 22, 10:15-11:45, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: The “Bate-papo com café” (conversation café) is a brazilian project for immigrants,  in witch different narratives creat new ways of performing in the world. Join the “Bate-papo” in Brazilian Portuguese  and perform in the world through different narratives.

Additional Contributors: Fernanda Liberali

Viviane Carrijo is a PhD in Applied Linguistics and Language Studies, who has always loved performing in the world for others. Currently, she constructs narratives in dialogue with different immigrants in the Brazilian context. She believes that, through diversity, different ways of performing in the world are created, and society is transformed.

Natalia El Hage is a 25 years old Brazilian. Besides being a law student,she spends her time reading and consuming any kind of art available, mostly musicals. Passionate about English, the young student truly believes that learning a new language is immensely regarding and capable of connect nations.


Interdisciplinary Collaborations: Thematic Models for Integrating the Arts and Sciences

Sandra Cheng, Gwen Cohen Brown, and Aida L. Egües

Thursday June 20, 2:45-4:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Workshop participants will examine an implemented model that interfaces art history, nursing, and pathology; and learn strategies of interdisciplinary course design to promote collaboration between faculty and students across disciplines.

Sandra Cheng, PhD is an Associate Professor of Art History at NYCCT, CUNY. She is the recipient of fellowships and grants from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Library of Congress, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Her research interests include early modern drawings and studio practice; and intersections of art and science.

Gwen Cohen Brown is a Full Professor in the Dental Hygiene Department at NYCCT, a licensed Dentist in New York State and a Fellow in the Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Dr. Brown is faculty at the AIDS Institute and AETC. Dr. Brown has lectured extensively on HIV/AIDS, Common Oral Lesions, Infection Control, and Oral Cancer since 1992.

Aida L. Egües, DNP, RN, APHN-BC, CNE, is a Full Professor of Nursing at New York City College of Technology (City Tech), CUNY. She is also a Fellow in the New York Academy of Medicine, with expertise in acute illness, disparities, interpersonal violence, mentorship, and public and community health nursing research.


Ebisu Sign Language Theatre Laboratory: An Ensemble of Deaf Performer-Researchers

Atay Citron

Friday June 21, 10:45-12:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: An ensemble of deaf actors, led by a hearing director – Ebisu Sign Language Theatre Lab was formed in 2014 as part of GRAMBY (Grammar of the Body) interdisciplinary research project that investigates compositionality in human language (www.gramby.haifa.ac.il ). Lecture and physical theatre workshop.

Atay Citron is associate professor and former chair of the Theatre Department at the University of Haifa and founding director of its pioneering academic training program for medical clowns. Since 2014, he is the director of the Ebisu Sign Language Theatre Laboratory.


Poetry Reading by Terese Coe, including her translations from Jorge Luis Borges, Pierre de Ronsard, and Heinrich Heine

Terese Coe

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: I will read from my translations of Pierre de Ronsard’s French (ardent and witty 16th century metrical poems), Heinrich Heine’s German (ironic 19th century romanticism), and Jorge Luis Borges’ Spanish (Borges is thought of as a 20th century magical realist but he is far beyond that, and an utterly unique master of metaphysics). These translations have been published in eminent journals in the US, UK, Ireland, and Canada. A selection of them appears in my second book of poems, Shot Silk (Kelsay Books 2015). 

Terese Coe‘s (Adjunct professor, English Dept, NYIT) poems and translations appear in Alaska Quarterly Review, AgendaThe Cincinnati Review, Metamorphoses, The Moth, New American Writing, New Walk Magazine, New Writing ScotlandOrbisPloughshares, Poetry, Poetry Review, The Stinging Fly, Threepenny Review, and the Times Literary Supplement, among other eminent journals in the US, UK, Canada, and Ireland.


Science Communication through the Art of Storytelling

Chelsea Collison and Taylor Williams 

Saturday June 22, 11:00-11:45, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: The objective of this session is to explore how STEM professionals can use storytelling to share their experiences and broaden the public understanding of science. The workshop will include brainstorming exercises and techniques to create dynamic stories.

Chelsea Collison is a full-time Museum Educator at the Florida Museum of Natural History. She has a bachelor’s in Anthropology from the University of Florida and a master’s degree in Museum Studies from Johns Hopkins University. She has also contributed to outreach and education for a handful of nonprofit organizations such as Rock the Earth, Alachua Conservation Trust, the Hippodrome Theatre, and Voices for Biodiversity.

Taylor Williams is the creative director of Guts & Glory GNV, a live storytelling organization in Gainesville, Florida. She is an adjunct lecturer for a live storytelling class through the College of Journalism at the University of Florida. Taylor’s consulting and coaching practice focuses on skills from storytelling, improvisational comedy, and public speaking to help corporate groups and NCAA athletic teams improve their communication skills and work more efficiently together.


RockEDU Online, Design Thinking, & the Importance of Iteration in STEAM

Disan Davis

Saturday June 22, 2:15-2:30, 8th floor room 822 

Description: Online is a new website of curated educational science resources created by/for educators, scientists, and outreach professionals. I’m excited to share how design thinking has shaped our efforts and complements our approach to the scientific process. We welcome contributions for the site.

Additional Contributors: Jeanne Garbarino, Odaelys Walwyn, Doug Heigl, Lizzie Krisch, Maya Kopytman, Kim Howell, Melinda Sekela, DataArt

Disan Davis is a biochemist and teacher, sharing her curiosity and love of science with others through various outreach efforts including the newly launched RockEDU Online website that curates resources for educators, scientists, and outreach professionals.


Art in the Lab: Drawing from Science

Alison Dell

Thursday June 20, 2:15-2:30, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Art in the Lab: Presentation AND Installation

Additional Contributors: Irina Ellison

Alison Dell is scientist and an artist whose work explores the structures and patterns in biological systems, and the production of meaning in scientific images.  Dell received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 2013, following pre-doctoral research at Columbia University. Both doctoral and pre-doctoral work examined cell signaling in developing neurons.


It Only Takes One Person to Open the Door

Becky DePodwin

Friday June 21, 11:00-11:15, 8th floor room 822

Description: This 10-minute oral presentation will discuss the importance of talking about difficult topics and the ways in which we can provide people with a comfortable and safe atmosphere to be open and honest and allow meaningful, positive change to occur to end the stigma surrounding mental health.

Additional Contributors: Dakota Smith

Becky DePodwin is a meteorologist with a passion for communication, and mental health advocacy. Becky holds a bachelor’s in meteorology, a master’s in emergency management and is active in the American Meteorological Society as chair-elect of the Board for Early Career Professionals & on the steering committee of the Early Career Leadership Academy.


Yes, And: Improvisation, Initiative and the Climate Crisis

Teresa Elguera and Josh Thomases 

Saturday June 22, 1:30-2:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: In confronting the climate crisis, we are challenged to understand the facts, feel paralyzed, and discouraged. This interactive workshop will use performance to explore how STEM education can communicate information, brainstorm paths of action and release initiative to protect our planet.

Teresa Elguera is an activist, community organizer, teacher, and professional developer.  She is currently focused on using improvisational practices to open up new perspectives and possibilities, particularly in using her knowledge and skills to combat the climate crisis.

Josh Thomases was a founding teacher and leader at El Puente Academy for Peace and Justice.  He currently runs a small charter school network called Great Oaks Charter Schools committed to equity, development and people. He is particularly interested in focusing his efforts in education to combat the climate crisis.


iMCB+: An Inclusion & Diversity Initiative to Empower Underrepresented Graduate Students and their Allies

Lisa Eshun-Wilson

Friday June 21, 10:00-10:15,  11th floor auditorium 

Description: The first of its kind, iMCB+ will empower STEM graduate students and their allies to develop concrete solutions to overcome unconscious bias and imposter syndrome. We aim to collaborate with pioneers in improvisation and performance art to create a safe, inclusive climate on our campus.

Additional Contributors: Michelle Reid, Susan Marqusee, David Weisblat, Iswar Hariharan

Lisa Eshun-Wilson is a PhD Candidate in the Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology at the Department of Molecular Cell Biology of UC Berkeley. She is interested in how cancer cells exploit microtubule structure to manipulate and strengthen their cytoskeletons. Her most recent published work shows how the chemical modification, acetylation, which is upregulated in aggressive cancer cells, promotes more mechanically resilient and stable microtubules.


What’s in a Name? How Clearer Definitions Lead to Better Designs

Soley Esteves and Debra Everett-Lane

Friday June 21, 1:30-3:00, 8th floor room 822

Description: Interactive, participatory, collaborative — we disagree about what these mean. But how can we create effective experiences for scientific education and outreach if we can’t understand each other? This interactive session will show how clearer definitions leads to better design and greater impact.

Soley Esteves is inspired by how museums build more innovative, curious and socially-engaged communities. Currently, she produces public programs, in-gallery engagements, and interpretive materials inspired by intersections of science, art, and culture at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

Debra Everett-Lane uses her skills as a designer, writer, and educator to create exhibits, experiences, games, and other projects that enable audiences to learn, create, share, and have fun. She is currently Asst. Dir. of Special Projects in the Exhibition Dept. at the American Museum of Natural History.


Aaron Freeman’s video interview station

Aaron Freeman

Thursday – Saturday, (including Share Fair), 11th floor room 1119

Description: Society for Neuroscience YouTuber Aaron Freeman wants to interview CESTEMER members about how you approach science communication and why you think it is important. The interviews will be posted on the SFN YouTube channel and Facebook pages. If you have 15 free minutes during the conference please drop by and share your thoughts!

Aaron Freeman is Artist In Residence of the Chicago Society for Neuroscience & a YouTuber for Chicago Public Media. He is a teaching assistant for the University of Chicago’s neurobiology MOOC, performs as an emcee, stand-up comic and creates humorous science-based videos for the Annals of Internal Medicine.


#SciOut18: Experimenting with Unconference Formats to Promote Egalitarian Frameworks in the Science Outreach Profession

Jeanne Garbarino

Saturday June 22,  2:30-2:45, 8th floor room 822 

Description: How do we ensure that professional platforms are accessible to all who wish to participate? To help support the national science outreach community, the SciOut18 unconference imposed little or no financial stress on participants, while also ensuring that everyone had a seat at the table.

Jeanne Garbarino began her tenure at The Rockefeller University first as a postdoctoral trainee in the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism, where she studied how individual molecules of cholesterol moved around inside a cell, and how disruptions in this process can impact heart disease risk in humans. After nearly five years, she transitioned to leading efforts centered on public engagement with science as the university’s Director of RockEDU Science Outreach.


Stage Chemistry: Scale & Ratio

Anna Gelman

Saturday June 22, 2:15-3:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: In the Scale & Ratio Stage Chemistry lesson, students will endeavor to create their own set design based on a Goodman production, with a given scale factor. Then, groups will swap ground plans, and will read and tape out each other’s designs based on the size of their “rehearsal space.”

Additional Contributors: Willa J. Taylor, Liam Collier

Anna Gelman is the Manager of School-Based Programs at Goodman Theatre. As a Teaching Artist and Director, she has worked with Northern Illinois University, The Runaways Lab Theatre, Rhino Fest, Director’s Lab Chicago, The Greenhouse Theater Center, Prop Thtr,  and Organic Theater Company, where she the Media Director. She holds certificates from The Moscow Art Theatre School and The Prague Film School, and is a graduate of Oberlin College.


The Poetry in Science:  Creative Writing Workshop for Science Communication

Kathleen Gillespie

Saturday June 22, 11:00-11:45, 8th floor room 822

Description: The Poetry in Science workshop is for STEM and STEAM enthusiasts. Participants work in selected styles, and engage in writing prompts of scientific theories and research. Materials provided: abstracts, protocols, and terminology for creative inspiration.

Kathleen “Kate” Gillespie (Assistant Professor in Biotechnology, SUNY Cobleskill) is a scientist, a published poet, short story writer, and playwright.  As Kate Gillespie, her work has appeared in Gargoyle Magazine, Silver Blade Magazine, Urbanite Magazine and others. She’s a Writer in Residence at Renaissance House Writer’s Retreat in Martha’s Vineyard and has been featured in arts stories in the Asbury Park Press, Martha’s Vineyard Gazette, Baltimore’s WJZ-TV and WYPR Maryland Public Radio.


Performing Science – Drama in the (Lecture) Theatre

Rinske Ginsberg and Terry Mulhern

Thursday June 20, 5:15-6:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: This interactive presentation details the unique collaboration between a Biochemist and Actor trainer and combines oral presentation, film and live performance to put the Drama into the Lecture Theatre. Participants will find themselves spontaneously folding into alpha-helices & beta-sheets (literally!)

Additional Contributors: Dr Sarah French, Lecturer in Higher Education, Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education

Rinske Ginsberg is a Lecturer in Theatre (Actor’s Body) at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne. A Master of Theatre Practice. Rinske has over 35 years’ experience as performer, movement educator, actor trainer and dramaturge in theatre education and the performing arts. She teaches into BFA Acting and BFA Theatre at VCA Theatre.

Terry Mulhern is the Director of Teaching and Learning for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Melbourne. He teaches in the BSc, BBiomed and MD programs. Terry is passionate about helping students ‘act like scientists’ and embody biological processes in a supportive and fun collaborative peer-peer learning environment.


Changing Millennials’ Attitudes toward IT through Online Discussions

Anu Gokhale

Thursday June 20, 3:30-3:45, 8th floor room 822

Description: Our current NSF-funded project seeks in part to promote more positive attitudes toward IT, particularly among under-represented groups such as women and minorities using online learning communities.

Anu A. Gokhale is a professor and coordinator of computer systems technology at Illinois State University. Originally from India, she has a master’s in physics‒electronics from the College of William & Mary, and a doctorate from Iowa State University. She is a recipient of many awards, recent notable one is Fulbright Distinguished Chair in STEM in Brazil.


Discussing the Whitman Poem “When I heard the Learn’d Astronomer”

Nicholas Gross

Saturday June 22, 10:15-11:45, 8th floor room 822

Description: A physicist leads a discussion about the Whitman poem “When I heard the Learn’d Astronomer.” The poem describes Whitman’s experience of a professional astronomical lecture. The discussion will focus on what we can learn about science communication from Whitman’s experience.

Nicholas Gross (Lecturer, Boston University) earned his Ph.D. in physics from Boston University and has been working on a variety of education projects for over a decade.


Queering Informal STEM Learning: Overview of a participatory approach to investigating the queer visitor experience at informal STEM education institutions

Todd Harwell

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: How might queerness impact one’s visit to a science museum? This poster provides an overview of a participatory investigation of the relationship between informal STEM education institutions and the LGBTQ2SIA+ community.

Todd Harwell (he/him) is a PhD student at Oregon State University. His research is aimed at exploring the relationships between informal science education institutions and the LGBTQ+ community. Todd enjoys bicycle commuting, getting muddy on the pottery wheel, and spoiling his feline son.


Scientists and Writers: How A University Collaboration (and Beyond) Shows They’re Good Friends

Cassandra Hockman

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Anyone interested in practical relationships between scientists and artists might be interested to know how undergrad and graduate students have benefitted from working together. This project can inform partnerships across campus, as well as community partnerships.

Cassandra Hockman is a science and culture writer working on a Ph.D. in English at Virginia Tech. She collaborates with civil and environmental engineers for her dissertation research, and has covered disease, pollution, environmental justice, science policy, and climate change as a university writer.


Communicating and Humanizing Science in Interdisciplinary Research Programs

Raquell Holmes, Angela Depace, and Ilija Dukovski

Thursday June 20, 6:15-8:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Can we build humanistic, inclusive communities in Tier 1 research programs? Does a course that develops scientists as people impact science? Experience and explore how we create conditions with play in Systems Biology and Bioinformatics for student communication training, growth and transformation.

Additional Contributors: Mia Anderson

Raquell Holmes, Ph.D, the founder of improvscience, is a pioneer in the use of improvisation and performance to advance scientific communities. Formally trained as a cell biologist, she uses her training in human development from the East Side Institute to help scientists build collaborative learning and research environments.

Angela Depace received her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, San Francisco. She conducted her postdoctoral work at the University of California Berkeley with Michael Eisen. Angela is an expert in science communication; she co-authored Visual Strategies: A Practical Guide to Graphics for Scientists and Engineers and co-teaches a scientific communication course for Systems Biology graduate students with Galit Lahav and Allon Klein.

Ilija Dukovski studied theoretical physics at Belgrade University, Serbia. His Ph.D. from University of Massachusetts, Amherst is in computational physics. In industry, he developed Density Functional Theory and Monte Carlo methods for modeling charge transport in semiconductors. He currently works with Daniel Segrè, Boston University developing COMETS (comets.bu.edu).

 


Creating heart in a world of STEM

Raquell Holmes and Marian Rich

Friday June 21, 9:00-10:30, 8th floor room 822

Description: Experience the improvscience approach to building creative, inclusive and developmental science communities- social therapeutics. Bring you to our improvisational practice that builds a playful learning ensemble and conditions in which participants can get help “creating heart” in their STEM worlds.

Raquell Holmes, Ph.D, the founder of improvscience, is a pioneer in the use of improvisation and performance to advance scientific communities. Formally trained as a cell biologist, she uses her training in human development from the East Side Institute to help scientists build collaborative learning and research environments.

Marian Rich, founder of Career Play, Inc. is trained as an actress, improviser and theatrical director. For over 30 years, Marian has built innovative educational environments where people from all walks of life come together to grow and develop. As faculty at the East Side Institute she trains educators, scholars and activists from around the world who want to infuse their work with the power of performance.


Generating ideas for cartoons with subject specific humor used for science education

Marisa Holzapfel

Saturday June 22, 1:30-2:15, 8th floor room 822 

Description: A creative method for teaching science is using cartoons. To develop new cartoons we go through a creative process which combines 2 creative methods, semantic intuition and the 6-3-5 method. In the workshop we would like to perform this process with the members and hopefully get lots of new ideas.

Marisa Holzapfel (Essen, Germany) is a post-doc at the department of chemistry education at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The main topic of her work is using humor and creative methods for science and health education.


LabX: Science for Society

Geoff Hunt

Thursday June 20, 4:00-4:15, 8th floor room 822

Description: LabX is a new public engagement program that aims to empower young adults to use science and scientific thinking in their daily lives and in their communities. This presentation will lay out the goals and objectives for LabX and describe opportunities for potential collaborators.

Geoff Hunt is the Director of LabX, a new public engagement program at the National Academies of Sciences. Prior to this, Geoff was the Manager of Public Outreach for the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He has a PhD in molecular biology from Princeton University.


Exploring the Relationship Between Performance Art and Physics Education Interactive Session 

Simone Hyater-Adams and Xandria Quichono 

Saturday June 22, 3:15-4:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: How can performance art transform a physics educational space? We are interested in the exploration of this question, and invite you to join us in this session to think, play, and create our own answers!

Simone A. Hyater-Adams, PhD student at CU Boulder, is a researcher with a passion for creating more opportunities for Black students. She uses her personal experiences to guide her interdisciplinary research and develops/facilitates diversity workshops with goals to cultivate a more inclusive and equitable STEM field.

Xandria Quichocho is an Afro-Chamorro student researcher at Texas State University. In the last two semesters of her physics degree, Xandria is studying the integrated physics identities of women of color and LGBQ+ physicists at Minority Serving Institutions. She currently participates in K-12 outreach as the President of the Society of Women in Physics and teaches cello.


Performing Physics: An Analysis of Design-Based Informal STEAM Education Programs

Simone Hyater-Adams

Friday June 21, 11:00-11:30, 8th floor room 822

Description: Come learn about the evolving design and implementation of the Performing Physics Program, an   outreach program the brings together physics and performance art!

Additional Contributors: Kathleen Hinko & Noah Finkelstien

Simone A. Hyater-Adams, PhD student at CU Boulder, is a researcher with a passion for creating more opportunities for Black students. She uses her personal experiences to guide her interdisciplinary research and develops/facilitates diversity workshops with goals to cultivate a more inclusive and equitable STEM field.


The Chaos Theory of Now: Theatre and Science Together

Jennifer Joy

Friday June 21, 1:30-2:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: The multimedia solo show, “The Chaos Theory of Now” mashes up chaos and complexity theories with characters from today, from Trump voters to Antifa activists. After the performance, we’ll discuss how science can illuminate the human condition – and how theatre can illuminate science.

Jennifer Joy (Performing Artist/Writer, Jennifer Joy Productions) She has toured all over the US with her troupe, The SciArt6, and with her science-inspired solo shows, to rave reviews. She’s worked with NASA, the Library of Congress and AESS. Her podcast, Where Science Meets Art, includes collaborations with hip hop artist, Benu Muhammad. She has an MFA in Drama from UC Irvine.


Using interactive techniques like cartooning, storyboarding, and small group feedback to help scientists craft effective presentations

Holly Walter Kerby

Thursday June 20, 1:00-2:30, 8th floor room 822

Description: This hands-on session will teach you three interactive techniques used to help scientists craft engaging presentations:  cartooning content, the structure of story, and guided, small group feedback.

Additional Contributors: Lynda J. Barry, Liz Anna Kozik, Ebony Flowers, Brittland DeKorver, Joan Jorgenson, Anjalie Schlaeppi

Holly Walter Kerby is a chemist, playwright, educator, researcher, and pioneer in the use of story-form to communicate scientific content.  She is the founder and director of Story-form Science and Fusion Science Theater. In 2012 Holly was named Community College Faculty of the Year for the nation.


Who, what, when, where, how, and why, why, why? Exercises for distilling your message

Carolyn (Carrie) Kroehler

Thursday June 20, 4:30-5:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: This interactive session will help you create short, clear, and engaging descriptions of your work or research; give you tools to  help others do the same; and provide an opportunity to meet other CESTEMER participants and hear about the exciting work they’re doing. Come play with us!

Carrie Kroehler, associate director of the Center for Communicating Science at Virginia Tech, believes in the power of play. She is a biologist and writer who is committed to helping researchers communicate their work to people outside their specialties.


Communicating Science: An Ethnographic Study

Carolyn (Carrie) Kroehler and Patty Raun

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: What happens when an anthropologist takes an improvisation-based communicating science course? He gets IRB approval to do a study, writes fieldnotes after every class, interviews other students, does a lot of thinking about communication, trust, collaboration, and improv, and makes a poster!

Additional Contributors: Todd Nicewonger (lead author, not attending)

Todd Nicewonger is a post-doctoral researcher in Learning Systems Innovation and Effectiveness at Virginia Tech, where he is project director for the university’s Destination Areas program and works to facilitate transdisciplinary research.

Patricia Raun is a professional actor and voice coach, a theatre professor, and director of the Center for Communicating Science at Virginia Tech. She developed and teaches the university’s graduate communicating science course and an undergraduate course, Introduction to Applied Collaborative Techniques.

Carrie Kroehler is a biologist, writer, editor, graduate school adjunct faculty member, and associate director of the Center for Communicating Science at Virginia Tech. She teaches Virginia Tech’s graduate-level communicating science course.


From Autism (and Vaccines?) to Zebra Mussels: Science Advocacy in a College Communications Course

Claire Kruesel

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: STEM students come to my communications course knowing how to write lab reports or assemble research posters, but how can we expand the reach of research and critical thinking? These projects showcase some of the unique ways students advocate for science literacy–without the jargon.

Claire Kruesel grew up in Rochester, Minnesota, where she researched at the Mayo Clinic, helped out at her father’s antiques auctions, and began a lifelong love of choral singing. She’s staked her home in Ames, Iowa since 2002, where she earned undergraduate degrees in Biochemistry and Genetics, then an MFA in Creative Writing and Environment.


Poetic-Scientist or Science-Poet?: A Reading of Poems Inspired by My Previous Life in Biochemistry

Claire Kruesel

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Claire Kruesel writes poetry from the intersection of art and science. Come listen to a poem or two about teaching a Biology lab, studying fracking as a graduate student in Creative Writing and Environment, or considering the discovery of the “God particle”.

Claire Kruesel grew up in Rochester, Minnesota, where she researched at the Mayo Clinic, helped out at her father’s antiques auctions, and began a lifelong love of choral singing. She’s staked her home in Ames, Iowa since 2002, where she earned undergraduate degrees in Biochemistry and Genetics, then an MFA in Creative Writing and Environment. As a creative writer, Ms. Kruesel strives to witness the natural world and illuminate the intersections between science and art. Some of the places you can find her poetry include Rattle and Prairie Gold: An Anthology of the American Heartland. As a lecturer at Iowa State University, she focuses on connecting science students with storytelling and oral communication skills to make science come alive for any audience. Ms. Kruesel also teaches yoga and pilates, serves on a local art commission, plays with a band, and lives with her husband, their cattle dog, and two cats.


Ten (mostly) simple things to change the culture of STEM

Alex Lancaster

Thursday June 20, 2:00-2:15, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: From changing the way we credit others, how we publish, how we talk about scientific identity, we can all co-create a more egalitarian and humane scientific enterprise. In the spirit of the PLOS’s  “Ten Simple Rules”, I offer ten (mostly) simple things anyone can start practicing today.

Alex K. Lancaster is an evolutionary biologist, engineer, writer and consultant. He is a Research Scholar at the Ronin Institute, a Research Affiliate at the University of Sydney,  a affiliate of the Institute for Globally Distributed Open Research and Education and a Partner at Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Amber Biology.


Lima Beans: Telling a True Personal Science Story

Wendy K. Mages

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Telling true science stories allows tellers to share personal experiences of science, as it invites audiences to experience the marvels of science in everyday lives.  This story was crafted to engage science teachers in a professional development workshop on telling true personal science stories.

Wendy K. Mages, a storyteller and scholar, she earned a doctorate in Human Development and Psychology at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a master’s in Theatre at Northwestern. She researches the effect of the arts on learning and development, and performs at storytelling events in the US and abroad.


Here in the garden: Using dance to facilitate informal science learning

Jame McCray and dancers

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: The proposed performance is an excerpt from a dance developed for The University of Delaware’s 2019 Philadelphia Flower Show exhibit. Come watch an urban garden spring to life while learning about some of the impacts of climate change, and how gardens can heal both the body and the land.

Additional Contributors: Kimberly Schoreder, Jules Bruck

Jamē McCray, PhD is an interdisciplinary ecologist with a passion for dance and theater. She creates educational experiences connecting scientific facts with performing arts to foster learning. Jamē is currently the Environmental Social Scientist at Delaware Sea Grant. She holds a PhD in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida.


Why Improv Creates Meaning

Liz Merry

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: This presentation will make the argument that if Logotherapy had an art form it would be Applied Improvisation. And to understand the power and potential of AI, practitioners should understand the basic tenets of Logotherapy.

Liz Merry has been studying Improvisational Comedy since the late 1980’s. She learned about AI as she transitioned to semi-retirement due to health restrictions. Her AI mentors are Ted Desmaisons and Lisa Rowland. Liz is currently very involved in The Sacramento Comedy Foundation, taking and teaching classes and beginning the first specific AI training program in the Central Valley.


Stories in Science Gallery

Fanuel Muindi

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Science is driven by people who face frustrations, mistakes, failures, success, discovery, doubt, confusion, and so much more. But what are their stories? In this exhibit, we invite you to come explore some of the stories from around the world.

Additional Contributors: Jessica W. Tsai

Fanuel Muindi believes in a future where universal access and exposure to science is possible for all. His core belief is that a strong foundation in science is one of the core components for economic growth, social advancement, and ultimately, global peace. During the day, he oversees the PhD program in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Harvard University. At night, he is a co-founder of the all volunteer Stem Advocacy Institute (SAI).


The Survivor Experience: Memory, Identity, & Self-Worth

Emma Murray

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Words have power. The significance of written word and thought was assessed in a study of identity in college-aged survivors of sexual assault. Learn about how trauma can impact one’s sense of self.

Additional Contributors: Mentor: Elizabeth Johnston, PhD (Sarah Lawrence College)

Emma Murray is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College and is now a Masters student at Teachers College studying Clinical Psychology with a concentration in Sexuality, Women, & Gender. She works full time as a research assistant studying suicidal ideation in older adults at Weill Cornell Medical College.


Isolating Elements: The Scientific Method on Stage

Jen Myronuk

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: How can living history theater and scholarly portrayals of scientists engage the public’s understanding of the scientific method? Facilitated by filmmaker Jen Myronuk, participants will experience a sample scene from the film Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie as digital theater.

Additional Contributors: Susan Marie Frontczak

Jen Myronuk is the Co-Founder & Creative Director of STEM on Stage, a STEAM initiative to promote narrative science through digital theater & immersive media. She is the producer/director of Humanity Needs Dreamers: A Visit With Marie Curie and Pursuit of Discovery: Lise Meitner & Nuclear Fission.


Engaging Practices: Using Technology to Differentiate and Collaborate

Kate E. O’Hara

Thursday June 20, 1:00- 1:45,  11th floor auditorium 

Description: In this hands-on session, participants will explore ways in which free web-based technologies can be used to:  increase student engagement, differentiate instruction, and foster student collaboration. Participants will learn strategies for implementation in their current, and future, practice.

Kate E. O’Hara, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies and Education, at New York Institute of Technology.  She has a background in instructional technology, urban education, and instructional design. Her research employs the use of narrative and autoethnographic methods within a sociocultural framework.


The Immersive Mesopelagic Performance Lab

Larry Pratt, Lisa D’Amour, Heather Spence, Eleanor Gates-Stuart, and Steven Haddock

Saturday June 22, 2:45-3:00, 8th floor room 822

Description: Come experience the Immersive Mesopelagic Performance Lab, an interactive performance that invites you deep into the sea. Embody and explore bioluminescence, echolocation, predator/prey and more. We’re a group of artists and scientists; experiment with us and help shape this work-in-progress.

Acknowledgement goes to Stephen Petrillo, Lighting Designer, and other consultants on the project – Karen Wisher, Andone Lavery, Arthur E. Newell, Jake Debbie, Ben Greenwood, Andy Russ, Ryan McKittrick, Ali Kenner Brodsky

Larry Pratt is Senior Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research on the physics of the ocean carries over to his artistic practices in photography, dance, theater and artscience education.  http://www.whoi.edu/larrypratt/

Lisa D’Amour: Playwright/Interdisciplinary Artist. Her play Airline Highway was produced on Broadway in 2015; her play DETROIT was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. Commissioned by A.R.T and the Harvard Center for the Environment to write a music theater piece about ocean health.. Pearldamour.com

Heather Spence, PhD: Marine Biologist / Musician. Research and compositions explore ocean ecosystems and soundscapes, particularly the MesoAmerican Reef System. 2017-2019 AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at U.S. Department of Energy, Water Power Technologies Office. www.HeatherSpence.net

Eleanor Gates-Stuart: PhD. Professor of Creative Industries at Charles Sturt University; Honorary Professorial Fellow, Faculty of Law, Humanities and Arts at University of Wollongong. Her science-arts research is extensive, innovative, questioning and engaging audience in art, science and technology.

Steven Haddock: PhD. Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute; Adjunct Prof., UC Santa Cruz. Haddock studies deep-sea organisms and bioluminescence using submersibles and genetic techniques. www.mbari.org/haddock-lit He promotes STEM education through practicalcomputing.org, biolum.eemb.ucsb.edu, and jellywatch.org


Physics and Figure Skating: Supporting the performer and scientist in each of us

Brean Prefontaine

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Despite funding and programming aimed at attracting students to the field, physics still lacks diversity. We look to informal spaces that allow students to develop their physics identity alongside their many other identities by intentionally blending physics with other interests such as ice skating.

Additional Contributors: Dr. Kathleen Hinko

Brean Prefontaine is a graduate student within the Physics Education Research Lab at Michigan State University. She works with Dr. Kathleen Hinko researching how informal physics environments can support multiple identities. She works to integrate her research with her other identities as a figure skater and coach by exploring ways that physics and skating events can support youth learners.


Integrated Physics Identities of Women of Color and LGBQ+ Physicists

Xandria Quichocho

Thursday June 20, 1:45-2:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: What can institutions do to support minoritized STEM students? In this presentation, we will be looking at student testimony and discussing the support systems that exist for women of color and LGBQ+ physicists in a university setting and the ways we can integrate them into our own communities.

Additional Contributors: Jessica Conn, Erin Schipull, Eleanor Close

Xandria Quichocho is an Afro-Chamorro student researcher at Texas State University. She currently participates in K-12 outreach as the President of the Society of Women in Physics and teaches cello. In the last two semesters of her physics degree, Xandria is studying the integrated physics identities of women of color and LGBQ+ physicists at Minority Serving Institutions.


DIY Solar Cells for Non-Scientists

Ana Sofia Remis

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Vibrant Cells is a resource for making DIY Solar Cells. Weaving the language of energy, botany, chemistry, and circuit design through multimedia modules, Vibrant Cells prototypes the range of aesthetics, costs, and efficiency differently designed solar cells can achieve.

Additional Contributors: Dr. Bhawani Venkataraman

Ana Sofia Remis (Science Communicator, The New School, Interdisciplinary Science) is a multimedia artist and designer with a background in environmental and interdisciplinary science. Born and raised in Miami, FL, she attended the New School where she studied technology & ecology. She has completed research at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.


Kepler Concordia: Play the Solar System

Margaret Schedel

Friday June 21, 2:15-3:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Kepler Concordia is a new musical instrument for scientific exploration of the solar system as immersive experience created by a team of programmers, artists, musicians, and engineers led by Dr. Kelly Snook, former NASA Scientist and Professor of Media Technology. www.http://concordia.world/

Additional Contributors: Kelly Snook

Margaret Anne Schedel (Associate Professor, Stony Brook University) is a composer and cellist specializing in the creation and performance of ferociously interactive media whose works have been performed throughout the United States and abroad.


Acting Out in Large Lecture Halls

Carolyn Sealfon

Thursday June 20, 5:15- 6:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: How can we actively engage hundreds of people in learning challenging STEM concepts and abstract models in a large lecture or concert hall? Come to this session to explore co-creating dynamic, interactive, insightful STEM representations that you may wish to try with your audience of any size.

Carolyn Sealfon (University of Toronto/Ronin Institute) has taught, or more, facilitated learning in the University of Toronto Department of Physics, at Princeton University as Associate Director of Science Education, at a Pennsylvania public university, at an inner-city high school in New Jersey, and in interactive workshops across the continent.


The usage of 3D printed models to enhance learning in gateway biology courses

Goldie Sherr, Raffaella Diotti, Adijat Adebola

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: 3D printing offers the unique opportunity for educators to generate tailor-made and highly specific resources that can be incorporated into the STEM classroom. Here, we explain our usage and design of 3D printed models in gateway biology courses to help increase understanding of the subject.

Additional Contributors: Seher Atamturktur, Mark Lennerton

Goldie Sherr is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at CUNY’s Bronx Community College. She received her B.S. in Biology from the College of Staten Island and obtained her M.Phil. and Ph.D. from CUNY’s Graduate Center. Her research interests include molecular biology, genetics and biology pedagogy.

Raffaella Diotti is an Assistant Professor at CUNY Bronx Community College in the Department of Biological Sciences. Dr. Diotti earned her B.A. in Biochemistry from Mount Hokyoke College and her PhD in Cell and Molecular Biology from the CUNY Graduate Center. Dr. Diotti is interested in exploring new technologies and strategies to increase active learning activities in the classroom. Dr. Diotti is active in supporting students led research projects.

Adijat Adebola is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Bronx Community College of the City University of New York. She received a PhD in Neurobiology and Behavior from Columbia University. She is interested in the role of the cytoskeleton in cell motility and migration. She also has an interest in incorporating student led research projects in the classroom.


Embodied Education: An Experiential Introduction to Movement-Based Learning

Emma Shockley

Thursday June 20, 1:00-1:45, 11th floor auditorium

Description: What is embodied education and how can you make use of it in order to make your classroom or organization more effective and inclusive? Experience an example of this form of education and learn how to make use of it for yourself. All levels of movement experience welcome!

Emma Shockley (Graduate Student, Laban Institute of Movement Studies) has a degree in physics, in addition to a rigorous background in dance and other movement modalities. She is currently working towards becoming a Certified Movement Analyst, with the goal of eventually developing a methodology for integrating movement into tradition classroom environments.


Dancing Physics: Engaging Black Girls in Embodied Learning

Folashade Solomon

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: This presentation explores dance is a site for learning. We share how our project built opportunities for learning and identity development in underrepresented students in STEM. Our presentation will share current design principles for creating more inclusive STEM learning environments.

Additional Contributors: Tracey Wright

Folashade Cromwell Solomon (Principal Investigator, Ed.D., Harvard 2011) has nineteen years of research and education experience, and ten years as a Senior Scientist, then Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Cheche Konnen Center at TERC. Her central teaching and research focuses on learning, identity, and exploring the connections between the Arts and STEM. Dr. Solomon is also an Assistant Professor of Education at Framingham State University.

Larry Pratt (Co-Principal Investigator, Ph.D., MIT 1982) is a research scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), author or co-author of over 80 journal papers and two books on the physics of fluids, educator in the WHOI/MIT graduate program, and co-teacher of numerous workshops exploring the intersection of art and science.


Rhizomatic Play Wheel: Linking Your Play Zones & Offers

Nicole Sumner

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: Rhizomatic Play Wheel: Linking Your Play Zones & Play Offers Germinate! Spin the triple wheel to win back your seeds of childhood play Root! Reach lateral strings from zones of play to areas of your home, work or community Grow! Cards with play offers to make- to the person standing nearest to you!

Nicole Sumner is a recovered high stakes tested student, lover of rhizomes and founder of Artways Playways and Purdy Women’s Prison Theatre Program. She teaches at CSUEB and ACOE’s Integrated Learning Specialist Program. Pronouns: she, her, hers. Past conference fave: SF Worm Summit.


Science and Art, transforming Students and Changing the World through Study Abroad

Sabrina Timperman, Lisa Schenkel and Sandra Bertholf

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: What better way to educate then with stories? The Mercy College Veterinary Technology Program faculty will describe a course which bridges the divide between science and art using digital stories to express what students learned after studying abroad.

As faculty members of the Mercy College Veterinary Technology Program, we have over 25 years of combined teaching experience in academic and clinical settings.


“Laser”

Daniel Bird Tobin

Friday June 21, Share Fair, 3:15-5:30, 11th floor auditorium

Description: “Laser” is an interdisciplinary performance piece that explores the nature of lasers, the movement of electrons around molecules, and our intellectual and emotional understanding of scientific research.

Additional Contributors: Scott Sayres

Daniel Bird Tobin is a director, performer, and theatre archaeologist. Currently he is a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Communicating Science at Virginia Tech. A graduate of the MFA in Performance program at Arizona State University, he has trained and worked with Dance Exchange, the SITI Company, Tectonic Theatre Project, and the Globe Theatre in London.


Finding the write level of engagement: Implementation of Student Presentations at the Board

Madhvi Venkatesh

Thursday June 20,  3:45- 4:00, 8th floor room 822

Description: Course-based presentation activities at the board can assist STEM students in gaining experience and confidence in presenting without previously prepared visual aids. This session will guide participants through the process of designing a board-based presentation activity for their students.

Additional Contributors: Taralyn Tan

Madhvi Venkatesh is a Curriculum Fellow/Lecturer at Harvard Medical School and Co-Artistic Director of Prakriti Dance. She has performed across the US and India as a soloist and member of reputed dance companies. Her academic work focuses on science education, both through conventional and arts-based methods.


Through Fish Eyes: Increasing Awareness about Marine Ecosystems through classical Indian Dance

Madhvi Venkatesh

Friday June 21, 9:00-9:45, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Come and see excerpts from Prakriti Dance’s newest production “Through Fish Eyes,” which utilizes the dynamic classical Indian dance form, Bharata Natyam, to evoke empathy about dwindling marine ecosystems. This will be interspersed with discussion on the development and meaning of the work.

Additional Contributors: Kasi Aysola, Lisa-ann Gershwin, Ramya Kapadia, Madhavi Reddi, Vanita Todker, Seema Vishwanath

Madhvi Venkatesh is a Curriculum Fellow/Lecturer at Harvard Medical School and Co-Artistic Director of Prakriti Dance. She has performed across the US and India as a soloist and member of reputed dance companies. Her academic work focuses on science education, both through conventional and arts-based methods.


Fake Facts and Courageous Curiosity

Nancy Watt and Carolyn Sealfon

Friday June 21, 11:30-12:15, 8th floor room 822 

Description: YES, people are social beings who want inclusivity AND we can view diversity as a threat.How does it feel to watch people get hurt by fake facts? Our brains naturally believe fake facts (biases and misconceptions) but with courageous curiosity, this improv-PHYS-ation workshop tackles our perception

Nancy Watt (President, Nancy Watt Communications) has a BA in Psych/Sociology, Certification in Applied Positive Psychology and is a Conservatory Graduate from Toronto’s Second City. Her combined skill of intelligence, energy, humor and charisma engages an audience and facilitates learning with laughter and connection.

Carolyn Sealfon has facilitated learning at the University of Toronto, at Princeton University as Associate Director of Science Education, at a public university in PA, and at an inner-city high school. She earned her physics PhD at the University of Pennsylvania and her BA from Cornell University.


The Intersection of Identity and Performing Arts for Black Physicists

Tamia Williams

Friday June 21, 9:45-10:00, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: We consider the role performing arts plays in the development of a science identity. Building on previous studies, we analyze interviews of Black Physicists and identify themes that relate to their participation in the performing arts, and map those themes onto the CPI framework.

Additional Contributors: Simone Hyater-Adams, Kathleen Hinko, Kerstin Nordstrom, Claudia Fracchiolla, Noah Finkelstein

Tamia Williams is a physics and theatre arts student from New York City. She earned her BA in Physics & Theatre Arts from Mount Holyoke College, where she graduated Cum Laude with Departmental High Honors. Her research background is in physics education research that focuses on developing theories connecting physics identity and racial identity for students of color, as well as looking at the intersection of the performing arts on black identity.


Exploring joy as a product of collaborative work

Lou Woodley

Saturday June 22, 3:15- 4:00, 8th floor room 822

Description: In this session, we’ll explore how joy can be a product of collaborative work. We’ll discuss what it’s like to be part of a team where the work feels joyful. We’ll also explore whether there are collaborative conditions that lead to the production of joy – such as overcoming challenges together, sharing vulnerability, humor or discovery, or doing generative work for social good.

Lou Woodley is Director of the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement – a research and training institute that supports those building scientific communities. Lou’s activities include designing, developing and delivering the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program, providing on demand trainings for community builders, and research into the role of scientific community managers. She is also involved in several STEM diversity initiatives through the NSF INCLUDES program.


Bioart Labs: Live Art, Experimental Protocol, Bioethics and Aesthetics

Adam Zaretsky

Friday June 21, 10:15-10:30, 11th floor auditorium 

Description: Bioart WetLabs create an interface between biology and the arts. Goals: demystify the tools and protocols of science,  appreciation of biodiversity as complexity, teach science without fact production. Experiential bioethics-in-action engages enigma, producing innovative conceptual re-evaluations.

Adam Zaretsky is a Wet-Lab Art Practitioner. Zaretsky stages lively, hands-on bioart production labs on: foreign species invasion (pure/impure), radical food science (edible/inedible), jazz bioinformatics (code/flesh), tissue culture (undead/semi-alive), transgenic design issues (traits/desires), interactive ethology (person/machine/non-human) and physiology (performance/stress).